Monday, October 20, 2014

A Wrinkle in Time

A Wrinkle in Time is a classic sci-fi children’s novel by Madeline L’Engle.

I know, I know. This another one of those, “How could you not have read this yet?” books.

Well, I’m getting around to them!!!

Many of you have probably already read A Wrinkle in Time – but for any of you who haven’t, join me in fixing this literary crime.

It’s a stormy, windy night when Meg simply cannot fall asleep in her attic bedroom. Wandering down the stairs she is joined by her beautiful, scientist mother and little brother Charles Wallace.

It’s on this night that the mystery of her father’s disappearance begins to unravel. It’s on this night that the marked difference of Charles Wallace becomes all the clearer.

It’s on this night that Meg meets Mrs. Whatsit.

Thus begins a journey of Meg, Charles Wallace and new friend Calvin O’Keefe – a journey that will reveal that far more is out there in creation than she could have ever imagined – including her father.

It’s a journey fraught with peril, magnificence and the fate of the universe…

I’ve always heard about A Wrinkle in Time and am happy to have finally read it. Unfortunately I read it at a rather busy time while I was terribly hot when our air conditioner was not being very cooperative.

So I look forward to rereading it in the future, probably when I jump into the other four books in the A Wrinkle in Time quintet.

I’ll admit I was oftentimes rather confused as I read A Wrinkle in Time – though always intrigued.

I loved the original feel of the characters and plot. It’s complex and demands the reader’s attention – which sadly at the time of my reading was not as focused as it needed to be.

A Wrinkle in Time shows a sad, realistic darkness, has a fascinating sci-fi edge – especially when the characters end up on the creepy, frightening world of Camamotz. It’s thought-provoking and features a lot of Christian overtones and Biblical quotes – which I personally loved.

Intelligence plays a huge, pivotal role in A Wrinkle in Time. Meg, Charles Wallce and Calvin are all “different”. They are very smart and are either hiding it to fit in (Calvin), misunderstood and perceived as stupid (Charles Wallace) or react to it by being inattentive in school and thoroughly shunned (Meg).

By the end of A Wrinkle in Time I felt perplexed – yes, again being honest here – but pleased.

I definitely need to reread this book – when I am not delirious from heat and exhausted from lack of sleep.

Hopefully you’ll get it the first time around!

1 comment:

readingunderground.org said...

I understand completely! I didn't read A Wrinkle in Time until I was an adult either, and I absolutely shared that same feeling of enjoyment mixed with slight confusion. I think it's a book that benefits from rereading, so I'm eventually going to get back to it as well.