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Showing posts from July, 2009

North of Montana

All over my paperback copy of April Smith’s North of Montana, there are reviews mentioning how “breathless” the novel is, how it “zips along”, and how it’s a “page-turner”.

What did I think?

Well, let’s not get ahead of ourselves.

Ana Grey is an FBI agent dealing with a sexist boss. She makes a great bust, but the aforementioned boss curtails her much-deserved promotion. She ends up having to prove herself on a high-profile case about an iconic actress claiming she became addicted on prescription drugs because of a deviant doctor. (Quite the hot topic lately, isn’t it?)

But while investigating the case and trying to please all parties involved, Ana is faced with sudden questions of her childhood. Long faded memories begin to surface, and a woman claims that a recent shooting victim was her cousin. A woman she’s never met. A woman she is apparently supposed to be grieving. Juggling the two proves to make both more difficult.

Thing is, I can’t say I agree with the super-positive snippets all…

Eyes Like Stars

Eyes Like Stars in the first book by Lisa Mantchev in the Theatre Illuminata trilogy.

Bertie lives on a stage. Her friends are fairies from A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Her crush is Nate, a pirate from The Little Mermaid. And her childhood friend and now frenemie is Ariel, a hunky spirit from The Tempest.

That’s right. On the stage Bertie lives on, all those characters from all those plays? They’re alive and bursting with drama. And not just the characters from Shakespeare. Every single play that has ever been written is represented in The Book. The Book that makes all of this possible. The Book that creates the magic.

But Bertie isn’t one of these characters; the theatre has taken her in, with a rather murky explanation as to why. It is her home. The only place she knows.

However, Bertie isn’t the most gracious of guests. She can’t seem to help making messes and getting into mischief. And when she is threatened with banishment – she has to find a way to make herself invaluable to the Theat…

The Quickie

A stand-alone suspense novel, The Quickie, is co-written by James Patterson and Michael Ledwidge.

Lauren's whole world shatters when she sees her husband, her best friend, with another woman. Instead of being honest about it, her horror leads her to "innocently" question her husband. He lies.

This makes it all too easy to succumb to the charm of a handsome, longtime admiring coworker. Before she knows it, she's made things even. But when her newfound lover slips out to get some ingredients to cook for her, Lauren witnesses a crime.

In an instant, what had started out as a heartbroken, accidental night becomes a race to make sense of what she's seen. The lies begin to pile up as she tries desperately to save her marriage, hear astounding information about the man she spent the night with without betraying her shock, and somehow not risk everything she lives for in the meantime.

The Quickie didn't convince me in the first few pages, I'll admit. I can be hot and…